English Studies Lesson Note for JSS 2 Third Term

English studies lesson note

Lesson note on English Studies for JSS2 third term – Edudelight.com

ENGLISH LANGUAGE 3RD TERM SCHEME OF WORK

WEEK  1:        Revision of 2nd Term Work and Examination Questions.

SPEECH WORK: Revision of Stress Intonation.

GRAMMAR : The use of conjunctions – Although and whereas as contrasts.

Reading and comprehension.Reading to understand the Writer’s purpose by identifying the key words in a selected passage.

COMPOSITION: A review of formal letters and informal letters

LITERATURE –IN-ENGLISH: Review of literacy terms and figures of speech.

WEEK  2:        SPEECH WORK: Consonant /t/ and /d/ or /p/ & /b/ at the initial and final position of words.

GRAMMAR: Using despite and inspite reading to summarize the key ideas from different paragraphs.

COMPOSITION: LIT-IN-ENG:- Use the recommended text on Prose:

(ii) more on myths / legends.

WEEK  3:        SPEECH WORK: Consonant sounds /s/$/S/

            (Sheep/Cheap, Mash/march/sheep/cheap/

Grammar: The uses of have, has and had

Reading Compilation: Reading to infer the author’s intention in a selected passage.

COMPOSITION: A composition on the topic “Pride Goes Before Fall”.

Lit-In-English: Characterization, Lit-in-Eng: Write a simple story on Honesty and fair play (A recommended text of your own).

WEEK . 4:       SPEECH WORK: Consonant sound /q/ and /a/ think / father, mouth/ father/

GRAMMAR: Synonyms: Using adequate examples.

READING & COMPREHENSION: Reading to identify word/expressions that signal or redirect attention to the main point.

VOC. DEV.: Word Associated with Human Rights.

COMPOSITION: A composition on the topic: The responsibilities of Government.

LIT-IN-ENGLISH: Writing a simple poem on laziness.

WEEK . 5: SPEECH WORK: Consonant /w/ and /j/ (words University, win/yellow).

GRAMMAR: Antonyms using adequate examples.

Reading and comprehension: As in week 1. Voc. Dev. Conflict resolution.

COMPOSITION: A topic on A Memorable Journey I Once  Made.

LI-IN-ENG; Identification of moral import and  the recommended prose text. (ii) setting plot on the recommended prose text.

WEEK . 6:      SPEECH WORK: Contrasting: Vowel/u/ and /u:/Luke/Youth, book/food).

GRAMMAR: The use of causative verbs. For example: black to cause to become black. Reading and comprehension as in Week 2.

Voc. Deve: Words associated with Religion.

COMPOSITION: Writing a dialogue

LIT-IN-ENGLISH: Use the recommended text on drama (II) figures of speech in the recommended text.

WEEK . 7:       Speech work: Contrast between vowels/É: /Ù / (caught /come, lawn/love).

School on the field etc).

READING AND COMPREHENSION: As in week 3

COMPOSITION: Composition on the topic: The long/would not like to remember.

LIT-IN-ENGLISH: Use the recommended text on drama.

(ii) Dramatization of same from the recommended text on drama.

WEEK . 8:       SPEECH WORK: Consonant and vowel sounds differentiated.

GRAMMAR: Review of prefix and suffix

READING AND COMPREHENSION: Refer to week 4

COMPOSITION: Write a composition on the topic: The Rich Also Cry”

LIT-IN-ENGLISH: Characterization, Dictation, Plot and theme in the recommended text on drama.

WEEK  9:       COMPOSITION: SPEECH WORK: Review of the consonant sounds with emphasis

on /q/ and /a/.

GRAMMAR: More on Question tags

READING AND COMPREHENSION: Review the language skills.

COMPOSITION: Review the composition of letter writing and essay writing.

LITERATURE-IN-ENGLISH: Review the prose text in use

(ii) Review of Drama text in use.

WEEK . 10: REVISION

WEEK . 11 & 12: EXAMINATION

WEEK ONE (REVISION

LESSON ONE:          Revision of Second Term Work and Examination.

LESSON TWO:          SPEECH WORK: Revision of Stress Intonation.

LESSON THREE:      GRAMMAR: The use of conjunctions –

Although and whereas as contrasts.

LESSON FOUR:        Reading and comprehension (Reading to understand the

Writer’s purpose by identifying the key words in a selected passage.

COMPOSITION:       A review of formal letters and informal letters

LITERATURE –IN-ENGLISH: Review of literacy terms and figures of speech.

WEEK TWO (2)

LESSON ONE: SPEECH WORK:

TITLE: CONSONANT /t/ and /d/ OR /p/ & /b/. – at the initial and final position.

INTRODUCTION: What is a consonant?

Consonant is speech sound which is produced with the obstruction of airstream. The obstruction could be partial or total. When consonant like /P/ is produced, the flow of air is obstructed by the lips. The obstruction here is called total obstruction because the flow of air is completely obstructed for a while. The important thing about the production of a consonant, therefore, is that there is always a degree of obstruction of the airstream from the lungs. The degree of obstruction of the air is one of the three important factors used in classifying the English consonant /P/ to articulate this sound, the upper and lower lips are brought together to obstruct the flow of airstream from the lungs. This obstruction does not last long as there is an immediate release of the air pressure which builds up. There is no vibration of the vocal cords while /P/ is produced. In all, /P/ is a voiceless bi-labial plosive.

Pronounce the following words where /P/ occurs at the beginning or end of the word:

Initial Position                                                 Final Position

Pat                                                                   trap

Pin                                                                   nip

Pus                                                                  sup

Pool                                                                 loop

Pack                                                                cap

/b/ – The of articulation of /b/ is similar of /P/. The lips are brought together to obstruct the air which is released with an explosive sound. The only different between /P/ and /b/ is that the vocal cords vibrate during the production of /b/ while they do not for /P/. that is why /b/ is voiced bilabial plosive.

            The only spelling symbols for /b/ is “b” but “b” is not pronounced in some words especially where it comes before “t” or when it occur after “M” art the end of a word. Example of such words are: “debt”, “doubt”, “lamb” and “bomb”.

            Pronounce the following words with /b/ at the initial and final position.

Initial Position                                     Final Position

            Bud                                                     dub

            Bat                                                      tab

            Bin                                                      nib

            Bon                                                     nob

            Bat                                                      tab

            Bomb                                                  mob.

/t/ – To produce /t/, the tip of the tongue is in contact with the alveolar ridge and this contract obstruct the flow of air. On immediate release, the air pressure escapes with the usual sound. There is no vibration of the vocal cords since the glottis is wide open. This consonant is therefore, a  voiceless alveolar plosive. There are many spelling symbols for /t/ and they are as follows:

“t” as in ten, tenth, talk

“tt” as in letter, little, settle

“th” as in Thames, think, thought

“ed” as in looked, hooked, cooked.

            The “t” is not actually pronounced in words like “Christmas” “castle, wrestle, listen.

/t/ at the initial and final position.

Initial Position                                     Final position

            Tone                                        note

            Ten                                          net

            Tub                                          but

            Tell                                          let

            Tap                                          pat

            Tip                                           pit

            Take                                        kate.

/d/ – The production of sound “d” involves the tip of the tongue in contact results in a total obstruction of airstream which is, however, released immediately with an explosive sound. The vocal cords vibrate as /d/ is produced. While /t/ is a voiceless alveolar plosive. The spelling symbols, for /d/ are “d” as in “did” and “ed” as in “moved”.

            This consonant is almost always pronounced wherever is occurs in a word like “handsome”.

            Pronounce the following word with /d/ at the initial and final positions:

Initial Position             Final Position

            Dam                            mad

            Don                             nod

            Down                          wound

            Dog                             god

            Deal                             lead.

Assignment

Give two words each on the following sounds at the initial and final positions:  /t/, /d/, /b/, /p/.

LESSON TWO: READING AND COMPREHENSION.

TITLE: Reading to summarize the key ideas from different paragraphs.

REFERENCE BOOK: New Oxford Secondary English Course BOOK 2 for Junior Secondary School page 132 and 133.

TITLE: The Ojo’s Family

Passage A and B.

Instruction: Student should answer correctly the exercise below.

LESSON THREE: LITERATURE-IN-ENGLISH

TOPIC: MORE ON MYTHS AND LEGENDS

Traditionally, myth is a story about gods or a contrived fable which contain truths beyond scope of reason. The legend on its own, is an oral tale of past heroes, passed from generation to another generation. Legends are based on the history of people.

Assignment

Ask your parent at to narrate an ancient story, while you write it down on your own.

Myth is an ancient story of a race based on its early beliefs passed down from generations, especially on natural events. Have you ever heard of your great grand father, a powerful hunter, who killed an elephant with a mere cap or single-handedly subdued a community and destroy its people? This is an example of a Legend.

            Oral – Literature

Orality                                     folk tale/song

Folklore

Oral Poetry                                                      Legend

myth

LESSON FOUR: GRAMMAR

TOPIC: USING DESPITE AND INSPITE (with adequate examples)

Despite: This is used to show something happened or is true, although something else might have happened to prevent it. Synonymously, it is used with “inspite” for instance (a) He had to laugh despite his failure

(b)       Her voice was shaking despite all effort to control it,

(c)        Despite applying for hundreds of jobs he is still out of work.

(d)       She was good at Mathematics despite the fact that she found it boring.

            Despite (as preposition)

1.         Regardless of: Although he might travel been prevented by something e.g. The mission blasted off today, despite the security effort.

2.         Contrary to: It indicates that something is done unexpectedly or unintentionally. E.g. She was wounded deeply despite all effort to rescue her.

It can be further used as inspite of, regardless of, not withstanding, (formal) in the face of (slang) even with, even though, although etc.

Assignment

Write five sentences using “despite”.

WEEK THREE (3)

LESSON ONE:         SPEECH WORK:

TOPIC: CONSONANT SOUNDS / ò//

/ò/- in the production of this sound, it involves the tip blade and sides of the tongue. The contact between the sides of the tongue and the upper sides create the groove through which the air stream escapes with a frictional noise.

The blade of the tongue is raised toward the hard palate while the font part makes a light contact with the alveolar ridge. There is no vibration of the vocal as the consonant is produced. /ò/ is therefore, a wireless palate – alveolar fricative and it has many spelling symbols which are listed below:

“sh” as in shop

“s” as in sure

“ci” as in special

“c” as in ocean

“ch” moustache

“ti” as in nation

“ss” as in mission

/ò/ at initial and final position

Initial position                                                 final position

Shack                                                              cash

Shall                                                                lash

Shop                                                                posh

Shore                                                               passion

Sure                                                                 douche

Champagne                                                     bash

/   / this consonant is voiced palate- alveolar fricative which has the same process of articulation as /s/ except that the vocal cords vibrate as it is produced.

 

In other words, /  / is the voiced counterpart of the voiceless /ò/. It is important to note that, /    / does not usually occur at the beginning or end of a word except in a few words of French origin. The spelling symbols for /   / are as follows:

            “ S” as in usual

            “Z” as in seizure

            “Si” as in vision.

            /    / occurs at the medial position

            Usual,                          vision

            Measure                       leisure

            Seizure                                    evasion

            Cohesion                     decision

            Erosion                        confusion.

Assignment

Identify the following sounds. Write appropriate symbols. See the examples

            Word               Initial Consonant

e.g       barn                 / b/

            Now do the following pure: , chassis,ship , march,pig ,chip .

LESSON TWO: GRAMMAR

TITLE: USES OF HAVE, HAS, AND HAD

            These are primary auxiliary verbs.

A.        HAS:   It is used with the third person singular in sentences in the past participle.

The past tense is had. e.g

1.         He has eaten the food

2.         She has swept the room

3.         Mr. Okoro has bought a car

4.         The director has travelled.

B.        HAVE:           It is used with the pronouns such as: I, we, you, they, and plural nouns in   sentences involving past participle. The past tense is had. Example:

1.         I have gone there

2.         All girls have slept

3.         We have just arrived

4.         Have you done the work?

HAD:  It is the past tense of has and have. This is the singular and the past form of Have and Has: It also involved the use of past participle e.g (1) He had an urge meeting with the board of directors.

(ii)        She had a terrible accident yesterday

(iii)       If she had not been disobedient, he wouldn’t have got himself into trouble.

(iv)       Mr. Okoro had failed as a teacher.

Assignment

            Form two sentences each using has, have, and had.

LESSON THREE: COMPOSITION

TOPIC: “PRIDE GOES BEFORE A FALL”

There lived a king in Agala village who love to give her daughter out in marriage. Many suitor has volunteered to do whatever the king will ask them to do in order to win the princess as a golden wife.

            The first test was that all man who had proposed to the princess should come to the place and dance to the village common drum beat”. From ten competitive, only two came out successful.

            One of them is a hunter while the other one is a porter. The hunter brags with the porter that he will win the next competition. The porter was quiet, believing God is the only one that grants success.

            The hunter went round the village to please come to his house to celebrate with him in advance, because he is very sure that the next competition will be won by him. He spent virtually all he had to cook and give people food to eat. On the other hand, the porter was calm; some even mock the porter as a poor non-entity man, who is trying what cannot be possible to him ever in life. Some even advised him to resign or give up for the hunter. The porter says nothing, but rather believes in God for his achievement

            On the final D-day, in the king palace, the king on its own before any man arrival, covered up two big items with white clothes and no man, know what is there.

            After little entertainment by the cultural group of the village, the king called out “Abike” her daughter to move near the two objects covered and stand there.

            The king then informed the villagers that today’s competition is simple, that whatever is under the clothes “Abike” will open will be her husband. Abike was ordered by her father to please open, luckily for the “Porter”, Abike open the cloth and everyone sees a big pot well designed and so, the king pronounced the porter a winner. So the hunter was ashamed and went to his house disappointed, but the porter jubilates for his victory and there conclude that “It is good to be humble because pride goes before a fall.

LESSON FOUR:  Reading and comprehension

Reading to infer the author’s intention in a selected passage.

Reference: New Oxford English for Junior Secondary School 2. Bu Ayo Banjo et at.

Unit 8, Page 74 – 75.

TITLE : THE ATMOSPHERE

INSTRUCTION : Answer the comprehension questions below.

WEEK FOUR (4)

LESSON ONE: SPEECH WORK:

TOPIC: Consonant sound /q/ and /a/ think / father, mouth/ lather

/ q/  – This consonant is pronounced with the tip of the tongue in a light contact with the incisors while the airstream passes through the mouth. The vocal cords do not vibrate as this process takes place so that the consonant is a voiceless dental fricative.

            Note: This dental fricative does not exist in Nigeria languages. So learners of English in Nigeria therefore, find it difficult to pronounce / q/  properly. The only spelling symbol for this consonant is “th”.

            / q/  at the initial and final positions.

Initial Position             Final Position

            Thank                          pith

            Thorn                           path

            Through                       oath

            Thick                           earth

            Think                           cloth

            Thin                             breath

            Thief                            wrath.

            Now pronounce the following words, paying attention to contrast between /t/ and / q/  .

                        / t/                                / q /___

                        Team                           theme

                        Tank                            thank

                        Tick                             thick

                        Torn                             thorn

                        Tin                               thin

/ J/ to pronounce this consonant, the tip of the tongue makes light contact with the incisors while the airstream, passes through the narrowing between the tongue and the incisor with some frictional noise. The vocal cords vibrate as /J/ is a voiced dental fricative. Since this consonant does not exist in Nigerian languages, Nigerian learners of English usually experience some problem in pronouncing it. This problems results in such wrong pronunciations as “day” for “they” and den for “then”. To avoid these faulty pronunciation therefore, learners should follow or improve on articulatory procedure described above. The spelling symbol for /J/ correctly, there is an additional problem of knowing when to pronounce / q /   and when to pronounce /J/ since both consonant have the same “th” spelling. There is no established rule to guide the learners but you may have noticed that some people usually pronounce “th” at /t/ in specific situations and pronounce the same “th” as /d/ in other situations where such people pronounce “th” as /t/, the correct pronunciation is /q /. In other situations where the pronounce “th” as /d/, the correct pronunciation is /J/.

“thin” pronounced / qin/ and not /tin/

“three” pronounced /qri:/ and not /tri:/

“then” pronounced /Jen/ and not /den/

“thine” pronounced /Jain/ and not /dain/.

/J/ at the initial and final position.

Initial position             Final position

Than                            with

That                             loathe

This                             soothe

Those                           breathe

Then                            bathe

Though                        mouth.

Assignment

Make five word at initial and final position of the consonants /J/ and /q/.

LESSON TWO: GRAMMAR

TOPIC: SYNONYMS -Lesson note

Synonyms are words which have similar, or almost the same meanings. Remember, however, that no two words in English mean exactly the same thing and can be used in exactly the same contexts. When we say that two words are synonyms, we mean that they are similar in many contexts. Example

            Words                         Synonyms

1.         Prosperity        –           Success, wealth, plenty, welfare.

2.         Happiness        –           joy, pleasure, delight

3.         suffering          –           heartache, affliction, distress, agony.

4.         Friendship       –           concord, fellowship, friendly, family, relations.

5.         arrive               –           come, reach, get there.

6.         silent                –           still, calm, peaceful, quiet.

7.         plan                 –           scheme, design, programme

8.         odour               –           smell, aroma, fragrance

9.         succeed           –           be effective, accomplish, achieve, win.

10.       depart              –           go, quit, leave.

Assignment

Pick the correct option to replace the underline synonyms .

1.         Jude defest the behavior of his father

(a) likes (b) hates (c) imitate (d) promotes  (e) incite

2.         His reaction to my advice was positive

(a) negative (b) vicious (c) doubtful (d) evasive (e) encouraging.

3.         He is very optimistic that we will win the match

(a) disconsolate (b) prophetic (c) uncertain (d) hopeful (e) exceptional.

4.         His suggestions on how to deal with the problem was found very invaluable

(a) useful (b) unrealistic (c) impossible (d) necessary (e) useless.

LESSON THREE: COMPOSITION:

TOPIC: THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF GOVERNMENT.

            What is government? Government is referred to as an act of governing because it is a body vested with supreme power of the affair of a state.

FUNCTIONS (RESPONSIBILITIES)

            The following are the functions of government

1.         Law Making: Government is responsible for making law in a country to ensure peace and orderliness.

2.         Provision of Social Amenities: They provide amenities like: electricity, potable water, health care, education etc.

3.         Defence of Country: They defend the country against external aggression.

4.         Maintenance of Law and Order: They maintain law and order through government agencies such as police.

5.         Protection of lives and property: Government is also responsible for protection of lives and property.

Other responsibilities are: provision of unemployment, formulation and implementation of policies, external affair functions, administration of justices, promotion of economic activities etc.

Assignment

Give brief explanation to the following responsibilities of Government.

(i)         provision for  unemployment

(ii)        promotion of economic activities.

Reference: New Oxford English Course Bk. 2 page 94 and 106.

LESSON FOUR:- Reading And Comprehension

Reference: – New oxford for junior secondary school course Book 2. By Ayo Banjo eta al.

– Reading to signal or redirect attention to main point Unit Nine (9) – page 89-90

Instruction: Answer the comprehension questions below.

Assignment

Summarize the first two paragraph in three sentences.

LESSON FIVE (5):- Literature – in – English

COMPOSITION OF POEM.

(LAZINESS).

Assignment:

Compose at least two stanza of a poem on the topic: Laziness with possible rhyme scheme.

WEEK FIVE (5)

LESSON ONE:  SPEECH WORK: Consonant /w/ and /j/ (words University, win/yellow).

GRAMMAR: Antonyms using adequate examples. Reading and comprehension: As in week 1. Voc. Dev. Conflict resolution.

COMPOSITION: A topic on A memorable journey I once made.

LI-IN-ENG; Identification of moral import and the recommended prose text. (ii) setting plot on the recommended prose text.

Topic: (Consonant Sound) /w/ and /j/

/w/ – To articulate this sand the back of the tongue is raised towards the soft palate by a position slightly higher than it takes for the production of /u:/.

At the same time, the lips are as rounded as they are for /u:/ while the vocal cord vibrate. Although the upper and the lower lips do not make any contact as to abstract the flow of air, /w/

Is described as a voiced bilabial consonant. The spelling symbols for /w/ are as follows:

“w” as in well

“wh” as in when

“qu” pronounced /kw/ as in quick.

Here are the less common spellings occur in words like: “one”, “once”, and “choir”.

Pronounced the following words in which /w/ occurs.

Wear                                                    Swear                                                  Swim

Wise                                                    Twice                                                  Twine

When                                                   Dwarf                                                  Dwell

Way                                                     Swell                                                   Squach

Queen                                                  Always                                                Toward

/j/ – In the production of /j/, the front part of the tongue is raised toward the hard palate to a position slightly higher than it takes for the production /i:/ the lips are spread while the vocal cord vibrate so that /j/ is a voiced palatal consonant /w/ and /j/ are called semi vowels because they shared the features of /ui:/ and /I:/ – besides, these sounds are called “glides” because the tongue glides immediately to the position for the production of the vowels after them. /j/ due do not occur at the middle and final position. You should not confuse the sound /j/ which represents the letter, “ y” and the letter ”j” which represents the sound /d/. The spelling symbols for /j/’ are as follow.

“j” as in yet

“ew” as in few

“eau” as in beauty

“ui” as in suit

“u” as in tune

/j/ at the initial position

Yard, you, yen, yet, yours, yoke, year, yaw, yet, young, yes

Consider the following on /j/

New/nju:/

Queue /kju:/

Human /hju: m2n/

Huge /hju:d /

Use /ju:z/

Humid /hju:mid/

Fuse /fju:z/

Assignment

Transcribe the following words correctly as studied in this lesson.

(i) feud`                                   (iv) year

(ii) use                                     (v) stew

(iii) hew

LESSON TWO: GRAMMAR

TOPIC: ANTONYMS – Lesson note

Antonyms are words which do not resemble each other in any way. Examples:

(i) Love – hate

(ii) Safe –dangerous

(iii) smooth – coarse

(iv) clean – dirty

(v) peaceful – warlike

(vi) strength – weakness

(vii) good – bad lent

(viii) rager – reluctant

(ix) success – failure

(x) importance – trial

There are several ways of charging the meaning of words to the opposite. The commonest method is to use prefixes. Example

Dis – disqualify, disbelieve, disapprove, disobey, disappoint, disconnect, disfavor, disloyal, displace.

Un – uncertain, unable, uncomfortable, unauthorized, unbroken, unclean, unconscious, unequal.

In- inadequate, inexperienced, incomprehensible, incompetent, incomplete, incoherent, invalid

Ir- irrational, irrecoverable, irregular, irrelevant, irresponsible.

Im – immobile, immodest, immoral, immortal, immature, immaterial.

Il- illegal, illegible, illegitimate, illiterate, illogical

Assignment

Give the antonyms of the following words : (i) admiration (ii) abyss (v) miserly.

LESSON THREE (3)

READING AND COMPREHENSION

TOPIC:  THE DICTIONARY

REFERENCE: New oxford English for Junior Secondary School.

BOOK 2.Unit II. Page 108-109

Instruction: Answer the comprehension question below

Assignment

Write five uses of dictionary

LESSON FOUR(4): COMPOSITION N

TOPIC: A MEMORABLE JOURNEY ONCE MADE

It was 3rd of August 2013 to be precise, I travelled with my uncle to Cotonou. I was informed by my uncle to get prepare for this journey to visit a friend since it is a break time from school. I was very happy and packed my clothes and other useful materials being the first time, I woke up very early, get prepared and my uncle came to pick me at exactly 7:00am.

            On our way, we got to Badagry Boarder where my uncle showed his passport and mine to the Custom officers. We were allowed to go immediately. After about 30 minutes drive, we got to Cotonou and not too long, I saw their airport, very big, decent, beautiful and fascinating> I wish to stop by and view walk around it, but because of the far distance, we are still going mu uncle couldn’t grant my request.

            Cotonou is a big country, with the little I could see, the motorcycle in their uniform looking decent, their market are well kept and neat. There is no avenue for street boys or vagabans. The roads are well tiled and clean. I saw companies and factories, schools, relaxation centres hotels, churches, stadium and theatre Hall. There is not selling by the road side unlike Nigeria. There is no haWEEK ing on the road, except in the garage.

            To cut the long story short, Cotonou is a descent, beautify country. We finally got to my Uncle’s friend house. It took good care of us and after the third day, we travelled back to Nigeria. I wish I remained there or revisit the place one more time.

WEEK SIX (6)

LESSON ONE:  SPEECH WORK:

TOPIC: CONTRASTING: VOWEL/U/ AND /U:/

/U/: This is a short vowel which may be described as a back vowel even though the tongue part used fr the articulation is nearer the centre than the back of the tongue. The lips are rounded while the jaw is in a “close” position. This vowel has the following spelling symbols.

“O” as in woman

“OO” as in foot

“OU” as in could

“U” as in put.

/U:/ : The long /U:/ is articulated with the back of the tongue raised to a height just below the close “position while the lips are rounded. If you pronounce “WOO”, the oral cavity become narrow as the lips are rounded while the back of the tongue is raised. It is not difficult to pronounce this vowel because many Nigerian languages have a vowel that can be approximated to the English /U:/. However, it is not easy to identify the spelling symbols for the long /U:/ because the vowel has many spelling symbols. The various spellings symbols are listed below:

“O” as in do

“OO” as in spoon

“ew” as in chew

“eau” as in beauty

“U” as in rule

“Ue” as in fruit

“iew” as in view

“Oe” as in shoe

“Ou” as in you.

            Contrast between /U/ and /U:/

            /U/                               /U:/___

Foot                             food

Could                          cooled

Full                              fool

Pull                              pool

Hood                           hewed

Wood                          wooed

Assignment

Indicate the shape of the lips when you pronounce the vowels in the following words.

            (i)         took

            (ii)        wood

            (iii)       dog

            (iv)       pet

            (v)        teach

Example: pit

LESSON TWO: COMPREHENSION

TOPIC: VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT (WORDS ASSOCIATED WITH RELIGION)

INTRODUCTION: What is religion?

This is the belief in worship of a superhuman controlling power, especially a personal God or gods.

            There are many words that is associated with religion, these are: doctrine, worship, Animism denomination, fanatical, atheist, shrine, church, Mosque, bible Quaran, temple, synagogue, pulpit, congregation, Pastor, Imam

Assignment

            Use your dictionary to find appropriate meaning the above words associated to religion mentioned in the class.

LESSON THREE: COMPOSITION

TOPIC: WRITING A DIALOGUE (A Play)

The Arrest of Prince Aole.

REFERENCE: New Oxford for Junior Secondary Schools Bk. 2, page 189 – 192.

Assignment

Answer the question based on the story read, in page 193 No. 1 – 7b.

WEEK SEVEN (7)

LESSON ONE: SPEECH

TOPIC: CONTRAST BETWEEN VOWELS/É: /Ù /

/É:/ This vowel is a long back vowel which is produced by raising the back of the tongue to a height where the jaw is between the “half-close” and “half –open” position. The lips are rounded. It is important to remember or not that /É:/ is a long vowel which should not be pronounced as if it is similar to the short /D/. The common spelling symbols are:

            “al” as in talk

            “aw” as in saw

“oar” as in board”

“or” as in sport

“ore” as in core

“oor” as in door

“ou” as in bought

/Ù/ – For the articulation or production of the centre of the tongue is raised while the jaw is “open” . The lips are neutrally shaped. The usual spelling symbols are as follows:

“U” as in hut

“O” as in come

“OU” as in young

“OO” as in blood

“Oe” as in does.

            Contrast between /Ù/ and /É:/

/Ù/                               /É:

Hut                              hot

Cut                              cot

Cup                             corp

Luck                            lock

Surg                             song

Stuck                           stock

Assignment

            Write five words that shows contrast between /Ù/ and /É:/.

LESSON TWO (2): GRAMMAR

TOPIC: Adverb of place.

INTRODUCTION: An adverb modified a verb. That is, it tells us how a verb does its work. Example: Slowly quickly, attentively, wisely poorly etc.

            Adverb of Place

            It is tells us where an action happened. Nowhere, everywhere, here, there etc.

Example:

1.         Alade lives here (Here, telling us where Alade lives).

2.         Samson came here last week (adverb of place, telling us where Samson came)

3.         They hid the car in an underground garage.

4.         They found if where you left it.

5.         The old man lives downstair

Assignment

Write five sentence that shows an adverb of time and underline appropriately.

LESSON THREE: READING AND COMPREHENSION

TOPIC: THE PAPER COOKING POT

REFERENCE: New Oxford English Course. For Junior Secondary School. Book 2, Unit 14 page 135 – 136.

Instruction: Answer the following comprehension question No 1 -8.

LESSON FOUR: COMPOSITION

TOPIC: THE DAY 1 WOULD NOT LIKE TO REMEMBER

            Long time ago, I was in primary one toward the end of term, my father’s house caught fire and the whole house burnt to rubbles. Many valuable things perished as we all rushed out of the house and stood a fat to see the whole house burning, and precious electronics were blowing out in the furnace.

            It happens we were all in the kitchen towards the back of the house, when someone ran in to inform us to run for out fear lives. At first, we were all confused not knowing which way to go: Not too long, we saw fire with flame, we all ran as we escaped far to another residence. My immediately younger brother was almost burnt in the fire, but thanks be to God who had mercy on him to escaped on his own to a safe hand. My family stood afar as we weep and say over the last property. As the fine extinguisher arrived, the whole house is already burnt. In all, we appreciate God we all escaped safely out of the house. This is the day I will not like to remember in my life.

Assignment.

Write a story not less than 200 words on the same topic “The day I would not like to remember”.

WEEK EIGHT (8)

LESSON ONE: SPEECH WORK

TOPIC: CONSONANT AND VOWELS SOUNDS DIFFERENTIATED

INTRODUCTION: There are forty-fair sounds segments in English, comprising twenty vowels and twenty-four consonants. The production of the vowels takes place as the airstream flows from the lungs to the mouth without any obstruction. In consonant, there is always some kind of interruption of the airstream from the lungs. When a consonant like /m/ is produced, the flow of air interrupted by the lips. But when a vowel is produced, there is no obstruction to the airstream. If you pronounce /e/, you will notice that the air flows but freely from the lungs. Although the tongue can be raised when the vowel is produced, it is not raised to make contact with any other articulator as to obstruct the free flow of the airstream.

            The vowel in English are classified into two main groups: pure vowels (also are called monothongs) and diphthongs. The pure vowels are sub-classified into short and long vowels. IN doing classifying English vowels, it is from the lungs that the airstream for the production of speech sounds as it flows.

            The consonant differ from the vowels in are important way: when a vowel is produced, air flows from the lungs without any obstruction but when a consonant is obstruction but when a consonant is produced, the flow of air from the lungs is interrupted in the mouth. A consonant is therefore a speech sound which is produced with the obstruction of airstream. The obstruction could be “partial” or “total”. The important thing about the production of a consonant, therefore, is that there is always a degree of obstruction of the airstream from the lungs.

            Just as vowel sounds are classified into short and long sounds, so also consonant sounds are classified basically into the following:

There are (i) place of articulation”

(ii)        “manner of articulation” and

(iii)       state of the glottis.

Assignment

Write out 20 vowel sounds and 24 consonant sounds in English.

LESSON TWO: GRAMMAR

TOPIC: REVIEW OF PREFIX AND SUFFIX

             REVIEW OF PREFIX AND SUFFIX

            A prefix is a letter or group of letters placed in front of another word to change its meaning. Example Un place in front of happy becomes unhappy. More examples:

ab + solve        =          absolve

ab + normal     =          abnormal

super + power =          superpower

Uni + lateral    =          unilateral

Uni + form      =          uniform

Pro + active     =          proactive.

            Negative prefixes give the opposite meaning to words.

dis       –                                   disappear

in         –           not                   inexperience

mis       –                                   misfortune

non      –           without            nonsense

un        –                                   unhappy

im        –                                   immoral

u          –           opposite of      illegal

Suffixes – A suffix is a letter or group of word to change its meaning. When a suffix is added to a word, it can change the word from one part of the speech to another.

a.         Some suffixes make new words with adjective.

they include – any, eny, -en, –ish, -less, -ly, -our, -ic, -like, -y, -ful. e.g dangerous, unless.

b.         Those which make the words verbs include,  – ing, -ed, -ude, -em, -ure, -ise, -ize, yse, e.g nationalize. Lighten.

c.         Suffixes which turn word into nouns include –er, -or, -ar, -re, -ship, -hood, -ness, -ment, -ance, -ism, -dom, -tion, ity, – -ure, e.g punishment, friendship, childhood etc.

Assignment

Reference: Progressive English

(An Elaborate Coverage of Grammar) Exercise 26A (page 181) No 20 – 30

and Exercise 26B, No 1- 10.

LESSON THREE: COMPOSITION

TOPIC: THE RICH ALSO CRY – COMPOSITION

There lived a rich man, who had only one child called Ade. Mr. Alabi Ade’s father has a friend called Ojo. Ojo is from a poor background who hardly feed his family, but he struggled to make sure in all ramification he trained his children to school from the little income from his farm product.

            Ade Mr. Alabi son felt riches is everything man needs to survive life. Sometimes, Ojo seeks help from Alabi, who in turn insulted him and asked him to get a better job to train his children. Ade enjoyed his father’ wealth to the university level and successfully guaranteed, so also the first of Mr. Ojo struggled with his father and graduated as supposed.

            Ade being wild in spending from on set, couild not managed the employment he secured after the university and joined the gang of armed-robber, who robbed a bank one afternoon and were caught by the Police, Tunde was unlucky and died by the gun-shot of the Police while others was arrested and sentenced to life jailed.       

            Mr. Alabi wept, as no man business over the lost of his son this is as a result of my parental negligent said Mr. Alabi as he sobbed with  his wife.

Assignment

            Write a story that end with this saying “The Rich Also Cry”)

(200 words long)

WEEK NINE (9)

LESSON ONE: SPEECH WORK

TOPIC: REVIEW OF THE CONSONANT SOUND /q/ AND /J/

REFERENCE: As it is in week four

Assignment

Place the correct sign to the following words as learnt in this lesson.

LESSON TWO: GRAMMAR

TOPIC: MORE ON QUESTION TAGS REVISION

            Question tags are phrased in question form which are asked at the end of statement.eg. she has gone, hasn’t she? She has gone is the statement while hasn’t she is the question while hasn’t she is the question tag. Question tags are also called question phrases.

            In constructing question tags, the following points should be noted.

1.         If the statement is positive (affirmative) the question tag is negative.

2.         If the statement is negative, the question tag is affirmative (positive)

3.         The tense of the verb in the statement should be used in the question tags.

4.         Pronouns are used in question tags instead of nouns.

Examples:

Affirmative questions with negative question tags.

1.         We are going to school, aren’t we?

2.         He will go to the stream, won’t he?

3.         He went to the stadium, didn’t she?

4.         She does to the market, doesn’t she?

5.         He has gone to school, hadn’t she?

            Other affirmative auxiliary verbs turned to negative

1.         He is not going, is he?

2.         He does not go, does he?

3.         He didn’t go, did he?

4.         He hasn’t gone, has he?

5.         He won’t go, will he?

Assignment

Progressive English: An elaborate coverage of Grammar

Exercise 6A, Page 133. No 1 -10.

LESSON THREE: COMPOSITION

TOPIC: REVIEW OF LETTER WRITING AND ESSAY WRITING

REFERENCE: Week in second term.

Assignment

1.         You were among a group of students from your school who went on an excursion to places of interest in your country. Narrate to your classmate who did not see what you saw, in at least two of the places you visited and how you have benefited from the experience.

2.         Write a letter to your brother who is overseas and tell him the changes which have taken place in your school.

WEEK TEN (10

REVISION

WEEK ELEVEN AND TWELVE

EXAMINATIONS.

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